Document Actions

Nanometrology

by Editor1 last modified October 28, 2006 - 00:17

Nanometrology is usually reserved for measuring the geometrical features of size, shape and roughness. Also, although not a direct feature of the workpiece, its position relative to a co-ordinate system is often included.

Chapter 8
Handbook of Surface and Nanometrology
Whitehouse, David J.

These are features usually required for engineering applications. However, the with the new generation of microscopes, (e.g. SPM) at least one of the features is not geometrical but physical (e.g. force). Aspects of nanometrology are measured selectively with respect to discipline. Figure 8.4 shows a simple breakdown in which each axis is in length. The y axis is here taken as unity. The point to note is that the engineer, physicist, biologist and chemist have different relative proportions of the geometry to deal with. For example, in engineering applications the roughness is much smaller than the size or shape. The nature of many disciplines begins to change character as the scale of size gets smaller. In particular as the scale approaches atomic and molecular dimensions the extra physical constraint of quantum mechanics has to be taken into account. One embodiment of this is the tunnelling of electrons through a potential barrier.

PHOTO WITH ABOVE

Chapter 2: Surface characterization
Handbook of Surface and Nanometrology
Whitehouse, David J.

For this reason what follows necessarily reflects the somewhat disjointed jumps in understanding brought on by improvements in measurement techniques. There are no correct answers. There is only a progressively better understanding of surfaces brought about usually by an improvement in measurement technique. This extra understanding enables more knowledge to be built up about how surfaces are produced and how they perform.