Katrina Jolliffe Ph.D.

Jolliffe, Katrina
Position Department / Business Unit
Department of Chemistry
Institution Disciplines
University of Sydney Chemistry
City State / Provence
Sydney New South Wales
Country Website
Australia
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Kate’s current nano-related research revolves around the use of peptides as scaffolds for the construction of molecular receptors, sensors, enzyme mimics and nano-scale capsules. In particular, she is involved in the development of cyclic peptide scaffolds for these applications.

Dr Katrina (Kate) Jolliffe studied pure and applied chemistry at the University of New South Wales where she received her BSc (Hons 1st Class) in 1993. She obtained her PhD in 1997 from the same institution, under the supervision of Prof. Mike Paddon-Row. Her PhD research involved the synthesis of giant U-shaped multichromophoric molecules designed to mimic the multistep electron transfer process that occurs in the photosynthetic reaction centre. Photophysical studies of these molecules has led to the development of a new hypothesis regarding the mechanism of photoinduced electron transfer in U-shaped molecules.

Upon completeing her PhD, Kate moved to Twente University in The Netherlands to postdoc in the Supramolecular and Chemical Technology group of Professor David Reinhoudt. Here she was involved in investigating the factors affecting the self-assembly of well-defined hydrogen bonded aggregates. Her work has led to a better understanding of the fundamental self-assembly processes in these systems, thus enabling the formation of unusually large hydrogen bonded supramolecular assemblies and laying the foundation for the assembly of even larger aggregates. Her achievements included the design and controlled self-assembly of several 15-component aggregates based on the melamine-cyanuric acid crystal lattice (multi-story rosettes) and the formation of a similar hydrogen bonded polymer. In addition, Kate was involved in the development of a novel mass spectrometric technique for the characterisation of self-assembled aggregates, which has provided chemists with a new tool to assist in the difficult task of the characterisation of non-covalently bonded supramolecules.

In 1998 Kate moved to the University of Nottingham, UK where she held a temporary lectureship and investigated the metal binding capabilities of naturally occurring cyclic peptides and their analogues. In March 2000, she returned to Australia as an Institute of Advanced Studies Research Fellow at the Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, honing her synthetic organic skills in the group of Prof. Martin Banwell. In March 2002 she took up her current position as an Australian Research Council QEII Research Fellow in the School of Chemistry at The University of Sydney. Her current research focuses on the development of new synthetic methodology for the construction of molecular scaffolds and platforms that can be used in nano- and biotechnology applications.

Education

Dr Katrina (Kate) Jolliffe studied pure and applied chemistry at the University of New South Wales where she received her BSc (Hons 1st Class) in 1993. She obtained her PhD in 1997 from the same institution.

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